Blog posts from Port Lincoln Railway Museum

Ships and Trains

Some cruise ships now include Port Lincoln in their itineraries, sailing into Boston Bay just after sunrise and docking at the main jetty. On these occasions up to two thousand passengers and several hundred crew descend on the town for the day. Read more about Ships and Trains >

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'Twix Horses and Conveyors

Specially modified tractors replaced horses for shunting rail wagons on the Port Lincoln jetties in 1952, and were in turn superseded by bulk loading conveyors in the 1960s. One has survived in virtually original condition, and is now being restored by the Port Lincoln Railway Museum. Read more about 'Twix Horses and Conveyors >

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One Last Look

Members of the Port Lincoln Railway Museum had the opportunity recently to inspect a former railway site. Read more about One Last Look >

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Memories triggered at Cummins Show

Country shows are special events in the life of rural communities. The Cummins Show in 2011 was particularly significant, being the hundredth held in the town, and it did not disappoint. Read more about Memories triggered at Cummins Show >

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Caring for Mothers on Eyre Peninsula in the 1930s

The Mothers’ and Babies’ Health Association's aim was ‘to promote the education of the mother in all that concerns the physical, mental and moral development of her offspring’. For the travelling sister on the Eyre Peninsula circuit in the 1930s, that meant a tough existence. Read more about Caring for Mothers on Eyre Peninsula in the 1930s >

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Unique aspect of rural life resurrected

From the mid-1930s, petroleum products were distributed to settlements along the railway lines on Eyre Peninsula in three unusual little rail tank wagons. One has been rescued for restoration. Read more about Unique aspect of rural life resurrected >

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A Garden Tale

Railway stations in years past often had gardens around them or on the platforms. In some areas these gardens were part of the social fabric of rural communities. One still is. Read more about A Garden Tale >

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History from nature's wreckage

This simple lump of wood covered in a kaleidoscope of colours could easily be mistaken for ‘junk’. In fact, its story and what it now represents provides us with an intriguing link to the past. Read more about History from nature's wreckage >

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